Posts Tagged ‘Readers Views Winner’

What I learned from William Makepeace Thackeray

Saturday, December 27th, 2008

Only a week or so ago, I posted a blog here entitled, what I learned from Ernest Hemingway. In it I said that Hemingway was good writer because he let the dialogue of the characters do most of the heavy lifting-that is the writer could convey emotion, mood, feeling etc., to the reader. To do otherwise was tantamount to having an annoying stage director come out in the middle of a scene to comment on what the characters were thinking and feeling. (more…)

Review of A Trial of One

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

This is the third review by Gina of Bookaholics in which she dares you to read…

Posted on December 10, 2008 by Gina

A Trial of One

by Mary E. Martin

‘Osgoode’ trilogy Book #3

Jenkins is on a frantic search for shares of Elixicorp Enterprises stock, worth over thirty millions dollars, for his elderly client, Norma Dinnick. The shares were originally sold to raise money for research into memory loss in seniors. Ironically, no one seems to remember just where the shares might be. Pursuing Jenkins through Toronto and London, and to the darkened, narrow calles of Venice, is Dr. Robert Hawke, a sinister madman who claims to have the cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

As their chase unravels a decades-old fraud, yet another search is underway for the mysterious Q.

Dorothy Crawford, widow of Jenkins’ law partner Richard Crawford, (more…)

Review of Conduct in Question, by Gina Robichaud, reviewer for Indigo, Chapters

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

This is a review of the first in The Osgoode Trilogy, Conduct in Question. I hope you are sufficiently intrigued to read it yourself. Then, maybe I will have hooked you on the next two, Final Paradox and A Trial of One.

A fascinating legal thriller…

Harry Jenkins is an estate lawyer and partner of Crane, Crawford and Jenkins law firm. First, his partner, Crawford, dies on the floor in his office while remember the love he once had with one of their clients, Marjorie Deighton. For Harry, things go from bad to worse and rather quickly.

Harry is asked to meet at Marjorie’s home; her intent is to review her will and consult with him about a meeting she is supposed to have earlier in the day. Along with his secretary, Harry visits the home of Ms. Deighton in late afternoon, only to find Ms. Deighton dead, lying on her bed. Harry believes that she must have died peacefully, but he is suspicious; there are just too many things going on that could make her passing a coincidence.

A mysterious man, Albert Chin, is referred to Harry for property acquisitions. Only, the properties are those surrounding the Marjorie’s estate. Plus, the names of the parties acquiring the properties seems fishy to him, as they are all numbered accounts. Money laundering? Harry allows himself to be blinded by the money, believing he may just live up to his wife’s expectations. But he knows the marriage is dead. Both have changed during their 20-year marriage; they no longer talk, nor are they in love. He also believes that his wife, Laura, is having an affair, mostly likely with her boss. Meanwhile, he fantasizes about the beautiful Natasha. And when he tries to deposit the checks from Chin into the trust, Mr. Mudhali, the manager of the bank, brings him to the office. It seems that Crawford had taken out a loan against the firm’s account. However, Harry believes that this is just as fishy as Mr. Chin’s acquisitions; it takes all the partners signatures for that loan, and Harry knows he’s never signed it.

And all the while, the serial killer, The Florist, is going around Toronto, judging and murdering women, using a knife to cut floral designs in their skin.

Harry believes that, somehow, they are all connected, even when he hopes they are not. But are they?

An incredible first novel by Canadian author, Mary E. Martin. Using her knowledge of the field, she writes an incredible novel filled with twists and coincidences. While the main character, Harry, goes through the motions of day-to-day life, he wishes his life were more exciting, more freedom, more love. And while I’m used to reading murder mysteries through the eyes of the detective, a criminal lawyer, this time, it’s through the eyes of an estate lawyer, one who usually deals with the passing of his clients, the grieving family and friends, wills, and estates. Not criminal. I liked the difference, and can’t wait to see what else Harry gets into. Also, I like how the author touched base on more than murder, money laundering, estates and wills. She adds abusive bullies, abused women, and very manipulative people. A fascinating combination. On to Book #2, Final Paradox.

Does Your Hometown affect your writing?

Friday, November 28th, 2008

I’m planning to write a series of articles about writing and the love of travel–which I do love. The first couple of articles start at home. All of us are affected by where we grew up and where we presently live. If we try, we can use that sense of place in our writing. Here’s the first article. Please come back soon for more.

DOES YOUR HOME TOWN AFFECT YOUR WRITING

Starting Out At Home

Before I launch on travels to “foreign” parts of the world, I want to think about what I am leaving behind-Toronto, Canada-and how it, my hometown has affected me as an individual and a writer.

I’m one of those people who, for the most part, has lived in one city, Toronto, all my life. Definitely, Toronto, of today, is not the city of my early days in the 1950’s where most of the population was descended from immigrants from the British Isles. In the intervening years, Toronto has benefitted hugely from the influx of immigrants from every country on earth so that now it is full of life enhancing, vibrant contrasts. And still, it remains a pretty peaceful place. In my lifetime, the city has changed dramatically. (more…)

Award Winning Novels Installment 6 and 7 “A Trial of One”

Sunday, August 10th, 2008

You are about to meet one of my favorite characters Gladys Giveny, Harry’s who is in each of the three novels in the Osgoode Trilogy. Gladys is caught in time many years ago in more ways than one.

That night, Gladys climbed down wearily from the bus. It swerved sharply from the curb, enveloping her in black clouds of exhaust. She regarded Mortimer Avenue balefully.

Dwarf maples lined her wide street of bungalows. Leaves hung limply in the evening humidity. Couples did not stroll on her street: there was no particular place to go. Children did not play on her street: the traffic was too heavy. Tonight, people stayed inside their boxy houses with the world blotted out by the whir of air conditioners. Gladys wished desperately for an air conditioner, but her sister, Merle, would not hear of it.

“Do you want to make me really sick?” Merle would whine as she fanned herself with a cheap, lacquered fan purchased from Woolworth’s last summer. “I got to think of my arthritis.” When Merle said that, it sounded like Arthur Itis. (more…)

A Trial of One, Chapter 5

Friday, August 1st, 2008

As promised, here is Chapter 5 of A Trial of One. It’s Civic Holiday in most parts of Canada this long weekend. So, I’ll post the next chapter on Tuesday. I’m hoping that by posting 8 or 9 chapters of each book in the trilogy, to get you really hooked into the story. Have you ever been travelling and left a really good novel in a hotel room just when you couldn’t put it down?  I’m hoping you’ll feel like that and have to have your own copy.  Here’s  Chapter  5  where  Harry  and  Dr. Hawke  square off. (more…)

CONDUCT IN QUESTION CONTEST

Sunday, April 13th, 2008

Between now and the end of April, you can enter this contest to win an endorsed copy of Conduct in Question, the first in the Osgoode Trilogy.

HOW? Answer this question.

What is Harry Jenkins’ wife’s first name?

Clue: you’ll find the answer by exploring the Conduct in Question section of this site and reading the first chapter.

THE FIRST CORRECT ANSWER WILL WIN A PERSONALLY ENDORSED COPY OF CONDUCT IN QUESTION, THE FIRST IN THE OSGOODE TRILOGY. 

Check this site on May 1st, where I will announce the winner.

Welcome. What Do You Look for in a Novel?

Thursday, April 10th, 2008

I’d like to welcome everyone to The Osgoode Trilogy Blog, which is brand new to the site. As I am just learning my way around it, please be patient, but have a look yourself. If you have any comments about the novels, Conduct in Question, Final Paradox and A Trial of One, all part of the trilogy or suggestions about the site and future topics of interest, don’t hesitate to send me a message.

I began writing the trilogy many years ago when I was practicing law and raising a family here in Toronto. Looking back, it seems I’ve gathered together a lot of thoughts about writing and publishing, which I’m going to share 9-10 articles] in hopes we can get a conversation going. So, please don’t hesitate to respond. And check back regularly for articles, photographs etc. So, what do you look for in a novel? (more…)