Posts Tagged ‘best legal thriller’

The Life She Wanted

Saturday, January 10th, 2009

I wrote this short story quite a few years ago in between edits of Conduct in Question. Sometimes I think that for a novelist, writing short stories can be similar to a painter making sketches for a large canvas. Have a look around the site. Enjoy.

The Life She Wanted

Martha Myles dusted the flour from her hands and wiped them on her apron. She found the beaters at the back of the kitchen drawer and pressed them into the electric mixer. Her new cookbook was propped open on the counter. With reading glasses perched on her nose, she stared at the recipe. Endless fine print ran across the page, obscuring what ought to be a simple task. (more…)

Review of Conduct in Question, by Gina Robichaud, reviewer for Indigo, Chapters

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

This is a review of the first in The Osgoode Trilogy, Conduct in Question. I hope you are sufficiently intrigued to read it yourself. Then, maybe I will have hooked you on the next two, Final Paradox and A Trial of One.

A fascinating legal thriller…

Harry Jenkins is an estate lawyer and partner of Crane, Crawford and Jenkins law firm. First, his partner, Crawford, dies on the floor in his office while remember the love he once had with one of their clients, Marjorie Deighton. For Harry, things go from bad to worse and rather quickly.

Harry is asked to meet at Marjorie’s home; her intent is to review her will and consult with him about a meeting she is supposed to have earlier in the day. Along with his secretary, Harry visits the home of Ms. Deighton in late afternoon, only to find Ms. Deighton dead, lying on her bed. Harry believes that she must have died peacefully, but he is suspicious; there are just too many things going on that could make her passing a coincidence.

A mysterious man, Albert Chin, is referred to Harry for property acquisitions. Only, the properties are those surrounding the Marjorie’s estate. Plus, the names of the parties acquiring the properties seems fishy to him, as they are all numbered accounts. Money laundering? Harry allows himself to be blinded by the money, believing he may just live up to his wife’s expectations. But he knows the marriage is dead. Both have changed during their 20-year marriage; they no longer talk, nor are they in love. He also believes that his wife, Laura, is having an affair, mostly likely with her boss. Meanwhile, he fantasizes about the beautiful Natasha. And when he tries to deposit the checks from Chin into the trust, Mr. Mudhali, the manager of the bank, brings him to the office. It seems that Crawford had taken out a loan against the firm’s account. However, Harry believes that this is just as fishy as Mr. Chin’s acquisitions; it takes all the partners signatures for that loan, and Harry knows he’s never signed it.

And all the while, the serial killer, The Florist, is going around Toronto, judging and murdering women, using a knife to cut floral designs in their skin.

Harry believes that, somehow, they are all connected, even when he hopes they are not. But are they?

An incredible first novel by Canadian author, Mary E. Martin. Using her knowledge of the field, she writes an incredible novel filled with twists and coincidences. While the main character, Harry, goes through the motions of day-to-day life, he wishes his life were more exciting, more freedom, more love. And while I’m used to reading murder mysteries through the eyes of the detective, a criminal lawyer, this time, it’s through the eyes of an estate lawyer, one who usually deals with the passing of his clients, the grieving family and friends, wills, and estates. Not criminal. I liked the difference, and can’t wait to see what else Harry gets into. Also, I like how the author touched base on more than murder, money laundering, estates and wills. She adds abusive bullies, abused women, and very manipulative people. A fascinating combination. On to Book #2, Final Paradox.

A Trial of One, the missing Chapter 7

Tuesday, August 19th, 2008

Here’s another favorite character of mine, Dorothy Crawford, widow of Richard Crawford, Harry’s deceased law partner, Richard. Have you ever met women, who have no idea how to live when the husband dies, because they have been so dominated all their lives? When I started in law in 1973, I met a lot of them. Dorothy is about to get the shock of her life about her husband in this chapter.  Read on!  (more…)

Press Release: A Trial of One wins Readers Views best literary fiction award

Wednesday, April 9th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A TRIAL OF ONE, By MARY E. MARTIN is a finalist for the best book of the year award at Foreword Magazine, 2007. The winner will be announced at a ceremony at Book Expo America in Los Angeles, May 30th.

Austin, Texas: A TRIAL OF ONE [Publisher iUniverse, 2007] was selected as

the best general fiction book of 2007 by Reader Views Annual Literary Awards.

Reader Views Annual Literary Awards were established to honor writers who self-published or had their books published by a small press, university press, or independent book publisher.

About A TRIAL OF ONE:

In an interview, Martin said

“This novel is the third in The Osgoode Trilogy and is preceded by Conduct in Question and Final Paradox, in which a Toronto lawyer, Harry Jenkins, is the protagonist and must deal with murder, fraud and deceit. Creating a rich tapestry of characters which will resonate with the reader, Martin also takes time to explore contrasting issues of love, forgiveness and compassion. At the beginning, Harry is a frustrated middle-aged man, trapped under his senior partners thumb and in a dead marriage. By the end of the third, A Trial of One, Harry is a man who can live his life with energy, conviction and passion.”

Please visit her website at http://www.theosgoodetrilogy.com/ 

For a review of A Trial of One, please click here. http://www.readerviews.com/ReviewMartinATrialOne.html

Any of the books in The Osgoode Trilogy may be purchased at any online or local book store.

Reader Views reviews more than 2,000 books per year from budding authors who have worked hard to achieve their dream of being published,” Reader Views Managing Editor Irene Watson says. “Our Annual Literary Awards recognize the very best of these up-and-coming authors, all talented writers who we know have very promising writing careers ahead of them. The Reader Views Annual Literary Awards are granted in 20 fiction and 30 nonfiction categories, as well as 15 specialized, sponsored categories. The entries are judged by Reader Views reviewers, all avid readers with a wide range of experiences, considered experts in the respective fields. Reader Views is an Austin, Texas, based company.