Posts Tagged ‘best legal suspense’

The Frankfurt Book Fair and StoryDrive

Wednesday, September 29th, 2010

I’ve never been to Germany but next Tuesday I’ll be there for the Frankfurt Book Fair. It’s massive…over 120,000 visitors and over 4,000 pariticipants. For updates, check out my blog at www.thedrawinglesson.com.

The Life She Wanted

Saturday, January 10th, 2009

I wrote this short story quite a few years ago in between edits of Conduct in Question. Sometimes I think that for a novelist, writing short stories can be similar to a painter making sketches for a large canvas. Have a look around the site. Enjoy.

The Life She Wanted

Martha Myles dusted the flour from her hands and wiped them on her apron. She found the beaters at the back of the kitchen drawer and pressed them into the electric mixer. Her new cookbook was propped open on the counter. With reading glasses perched on her nose, she stared at the recipe. Endless fine print ran across the page, obscuring what ought to be a simple task. (more…)

ON THE MAGIC OF TRAVEL AND WRITING

Friday, December 12th, 2008

Magic in travel? You must be kidding! All we hope is to get there and back safely. When we consider the long lines, the cancelled flights, the rude security staff and the cramped seats on planes, don’t we all feel a lot like cattle being pushed and prodded from A to B? Now you’re asking for magic? Isn’t that a bit much?

Perhaps it is a tall order, but I’m thinking of those moments-and they may be few and far between-when suddenly, on your travels, you see or experience something that makes you view the world in a new way, from a different perspective. The world opens up and that, in itself, may be magical. Isn’t that the real purpose of travel-unless we’re talking about business trips? (more…)

Review of A Trial of One

Thursday, December 11th, 2008

This is the third review by Gina of Bookaholics in which she dares you to read…

Posted on December 10, 2008 by Gina

A Trial of One

by Mary E. Martin

‘Osgoode’ trilogy Book #3

Jenkins is on a frantic search for shares of Elixicorp Enterprises stock, worth over thirty millions dollars, for his elderly client, Norma Dinnick. The shares were originally sold to raise money for research into memory loss in seniors. Ironically, no one seems to remember just where the shares might be. Pursuing Jenkins through Toronto and London, and to the darkened, narrow calles of Venice, is Dr. Robert Hawke, a sinister madman who claims to have the cure for Alzheimer’s disease.

As their chase unravels a decades-old fraud, yet another search is underway for the mysterious Q.

Dorothy Crawford, widow of Jenkins’ law partner Richard Crawford, (more…)

Review of Final Paradox by Gina

Wednesday, December 10th, 2008

Here’s a new review of Final Paradox, the second in The Osgoode Trilogy. I want to thank Gina for her great reviews of the first two novels in the trilogy. I understand she will be reviewing A Trial of One very soon and so, I hope she likes it as much as the first two.

Final Paradox by Mary E. Martin (’Osgoode’ trilogy Book #2)

Posted on December 10, 2008 by Gina

Final Paradox

by Mary E. Martin

‘Osgoode’ trilogy Book #2

Can love and forgiveness be found amid fraud and deceit?

Harry Jenkins is an honest lawher, seeking truth and love in a world darkened by fraud and deceit. Years back, Elixicorp, a company developing a drug to forestall memory loss, defrauded millions from Toronto’s elite. But since then, no one has been able to find this long buried treasure, which has poisoned the lives of all who seek it.

His elderly client, Norma Dinnick, teeters between lucidity and madness in her dark world of paradoxical claims. When she instructs Harry to sue the other claimants for the Elixicorp shares, one of the litigants is fatally shot in open court at Osgoode Hall. The murder weapon is an ornate, silver pistol, which is both a means of betrayal and a gift of love. Peter Saunderson, an old acquaintance of Harry’s from law school, surfaces to frame his own wife and lover with the courtroom murder and to implicate Harry in the scheme.

Harry and his father have been estranged for years. Stanley is found unconscious at the foot of his cellar steps, a gun in his hand. Waking from his coma, he asks Harry’s forgiveness for a long-buried wrong. This ugly .38 caliber gun becomes the means whereby love and forgiveness is found. Beset with questions, Harry turns to the beautiful Natasha, who guides him to an understanding of the final paradox.

Review: An excellent read, in no way a light read - by far!

Harry Jenkins believes his client, Norma Dinnick, an eight-seven-year-old widow, is balancing on a very thin line between reality and insanity. Norma calls Harry with the intention of rewriting her will, and is convinced that Archie Brinks, the executor of her estate, is trying to poison her by substituting her arthritis medication. He wants her money and the share that her deceased husband had hidden years before. She’s determined to change her will, naming her goddaughter, Bronwyn (a friend’s daughter), sole beneficiary and Harry as her executor. She firmly believes that George Pappas, Peter Saunderson (Bronwyn’s gay husband), Archie Brinks and others are after the Elixicorp share she believes is rightfully hers.

But the share isn’t - nor does it belong to any of them, for years ago, fraud and deceit were commited against high-class Torontonians, having them believe that Elixicorp was developing medication to prevent memory loss. Millions were invested, and without that share, the money is out of reach for all. Before his death, Arthur had hidden the money. After being threatened by Robert Hawke and George Pappas, he commited suicide rather than face a horrific, torturous death by their hands, and left specific instructions for Norma.

But Norma’s mind is no longer what it used to be, as she ’sees’ and ‘talks’ with her husband and David, her lover, and believes there are bad tenants residing above her when, in fact, the apartment above her own is completely empty. And now Harry’s stuck in the middle, while more and more, the men who are supposed to be finding the hidden share are turning up murdered.

Meanwhile, Harry’s love-life is at a crawl. Divorced from his wife, Harry has fallen in love with Natasha. One minute, she is warm and inviting, and the next, she’s cool and withdrawan. And Harry doesn’t understand why.

Again, another great mystery. Ms. Martin knows how to create a complex plot(s). While I did find that there were too many characters and sometimes hard to keep track of them, each one plays a particular role, and all working for George Pappas, all after the same thing; the missing Elixicorp share. So complex a story, let this be a word of caution: while an excellent tale, this novel is by no means a light read. This is not a book you can pick up and finish in a few short hours, even if it is only a 268-page Trade Paperback. It needs and deserves your complete attention. Way to go, Ms. Martin! Can’t wait to start A Trial of One, Book #3!

Check out Gina’s blog at http://bookaholicsreview.wordpress.com/

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Review of Conduct in Question, by Gina Robichaud, reviewer for Indigo, Chapters

Sunday, December 7th, 2008

This is a review of the first in The Osgoode Trilogy, Conduct in Question. I hope you are sufficiently intrigued to read it yourself. Then, maybe I will have hooked you on the next two, Final Paradox and A Trial of One.

A fascinating legal thriller…

Harry Jenkins is an estate lawyer and partner of Crane, Crawford and Jenkins law firm. First, his partner, Crawford, dies on the floor in his office while remember the love he once had with one of their clients, Marjorie Deighton. For Harry, things go from bad to worse and rather quickly.

Harry is asked to meet at Marjorie’s home; her intent is to review her will and consult with him about a meeting she is supposed to have earlier in the day. Along with his secretary, Harry visits the home of Ms. Deighton in late afternoon, only to find Ms. Deighton dead, lying on her bed. Harry believes that she must have died peacefully, but he is suspicious; there are just too many things going on that could make her passing a coincidence.

A mysterious man, Albert Chin, is referred to Harry for property acquisitions. Only, the properties are those surrounding the Marjorie’s estate. Plus, the names of the parties acquiring the properties seems fishy to him, as they are all numbered accounts. Money laundering? Harry allows himself to be blinded by the money, believing he may just live up to his wife’s expectations. But he knows the marriage is dead. Both have changed during their 20-year marriage; they no longer talk, nor are they in love. He also believes that his wife, Laura, is having an affair, mostly likely with her boss. Meanwhile, he fantasizes about the beautiful Natasha. And when he tries to deposit the checks from Chin into the trust, Mr. Mudhali, the manager of the bank, brings him to the office. It seems that Crawford had taken out a loan against the firm’s account. However, Harry believes that this is just as fishy as Mr. Chin’s acquisitions; it takes all the partners signatures for that loan, and Harry knows he’s never signed it.

And all the while, the serial killer, The Florist, is going around Toronto, judging and murdering women, using a knife to cut floral designs in their skin.

Harry believes that, somehow, they are all connected, even when he hopes they are not. But are they?

An incredible first novel by Canadian author, Mary E. Martin. Using her knowledge of the field, she writes an incredible novel filled with twists and coincidences. While the main character, Harry, goes through the motions of day-to-day life, he wishes his life were more exciting, more freedom, more love. And while I’m used to reading murder mysteries through the eyes of the detective, a criminal lawyer, this time, it’s through the eyes of an estate lawyer, one who usually deals with the passing of his clients, the grieving family and friends, wills, and estates. Not criminal. I liked the difference, and can’t wait to see what else Harry gets into. Also, I like how the author touched base on more than murder, money laundering, estates and wills. She adds abusive bullies, abused women, and very manipulative people. A fascinating combination. On to Book #2, Final Paradox.

Death in Venice

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

Do you know the great novella by Thomas Mann, Death in Venice? If you haven’t read it, you may well have seen the movie. When I was in Venice, I was haunted by this story as I wandered through the narrow, twisting calles on my last trip more than seven years ago. In fact, I entitled the photograph below Death in Venice, which I took of a cafe on San Marco.

(more…)

A Trial of One wins the Readers Views literary award for best fiction

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

  So, now that you have met Harry Jenkins and his elderly client Norma Dinnick, I am going to introduce you to Dr. Robert Hawke, Harry’s adversary. This charming, but sinister madman claims to have a cure for Alzheimer’s. Where do we meet him? In his bathtub at the King Edward Hotel in Toronto.

I’ll be posting various chapters, so please read on and come back for more. Hopefully, you’ll be so intrigued that you will have to buy A Trial of One.  CHAPTER 2 (more…)

Press Release: A Trial of One wins Readers Views best literary fiction award

Wednesday, April 9th, 2008

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

A TRIAL OF ONE, By MARY E. MARTIN is a finalist for the best book of the year award at Foreword Magazine, 2007. The winner will be announced at a ceremony at Book Expo America in Los Angeles, May 30th.

Austin, Texas: A TRIAL OF ONE [Publisher iUniverse, 2007] was selected as

the best general fiction book of 2007 by Reader Views Annual Literary Awards.

Reader Views Annual Literary Awards were established to honor writers who self-published or had their books published by a small press, university press, or independent book publisher.

About A TRIAL OF ONE:

In an interview, Martin said

“This novel is the third in The Osgoode Trilogy and is preceded by Conduct in Question and Final Paradox, in which a Toronto lawyer, Harry Jenkins, is the protagonist and must deal with murder, fraud and deceit. Creating a rich tapestry of characters which will resonate with the reader, Martin also takes time to explore contrasting issues of love, forgiveness and compassion. At the beginning, Harry is a frustrated middle-aged man, trapped under his senior partners thumb and in a dead marriage. By the end of the third, A Trial of One, Harry is a man who can live his life with energy, conviction and passion.”

Please visit her website at http://www.theosgoodetrilogy.com/ 

For a review of A Trial of One, please click here. http://www.readerviews.com/ReviewMartinATrialOne.html

Any of the books in The Osgoode Trilogy may be purchased at any online or local book store.

Reader Views reviews more than 2,000 books per year from budding authors who have worked hard to achieve their dream of being published,” Reader Views Managing Editor Irene Watson says. “Our Annual Literary Awards recognize the very best of these up-and-coming authors, all talented writers who we know have very promising writing careers ahead of them. The Reader Views Annual Literary Awards are granted in 20 fiction and 30 nonfiction categories, as well as 15 specialized, sponsored categories. The entries are judged by Reader Views reviewers, all avid readers with a wide range of experiences, considered experts in the respective fields. Reader Views is an Austin, Texas, based company.